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Will Stanford Take the F Train to Silicon Island? Tensions Rise as Deadline for Tech Campus Approaches

September 28, 2011 Leave a comment

As the Oct. 28 deadline for proposals approaches, both neighborhood advocates and the institutions bidding have intensified their campaigns. Scuttlebutt has Stanford as the frontrunner and Roosevelt Island as the likely site, agitating folks like Ms. Dolan and institutions like N.Y.U.

From BetaBeat:

“If replicating the talent engine that fuels Silicon Valley sounds ambitious, City Hall’s underlying vision is even more enterprising. New York City’s Economic Development Corporation has offered universities around the world a chance to compete for city-owned land in the hopes of besting the Valley, wresting the title of innovation capital from global competitors and remaking New York’s industrial landscape. So long Goldman Sachs, hello start-ups—if it comes to that, of course. Estimates are that the project will generate $6 billion in economic activity over the next few decades and add 8,000 construction jobs and spin out 400 companies in the coming years.

The E.D.C.’s application makes no bones about its goal: “Increase the probability that the next high growth company—a Google, Amazon, or Facebook—will emerge in New York City and not in Shanghai, Mumbai, or Sao Paolo…”

READ FULL ARTICLE [web]

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Clean-tech ‘accelerator’ Greenstart opens in S.F.

September 24, 2011 Leave a comment

Greenstart aims to help startups succeed by providing seed funding, resources, mentors, networking opportunities and connections to investors during an intensive three-month program, similar to the “boot camp for startups” that Mountain View’s Y Combinator runs for tech firms.

From SF Gate:

“Greenstart, an “accelerator” to boost fledgling clean-technology companies, opened its reclaimed-wood doors in downtown San Francisco on Tuesday, the first such enterprise in a city that hopes to become a hub for clean tech.

The first four companies of what eventually will be hundreds cycling through Greenstart’s flexible work space represent an array of clean-tech approaches: biomass diesel, a smart plug, energy monitoring software and a smart window shade. Greenstart said the four, selected from 130 applicants, are already capital efficient and able to generate revenue in 12 months or less…”

READ FULL ARTICLE [web]
GREENSTART [web]
Applications re-open October 2, 2011 [web]

MassChallenge: Why the world’s largest startup incubator is also a non-profit

September 24, 2011 Leave a comment

We take these teams out of their moms’ basements and put them on the 14th floor of a sky-rise on Boston’s waterfront.

From The Next Web Insider:

“At the forefront of excellence and prestige is the Boston-based non-profit, MassChallenge, which bills itself as “the world’s largest startup competition”. MassChallenge is a very special kind of accelerator, as it is both an independent non-profit and does not take equity. Now, in its second year, MassChallenge is incubating 125 companies in its Boston waterfront offices, and each team is competing for $1 million in prizes. The competition is open to anyone in the world, for any new startup, in any industry.

For MassChallenge’s first class, it received 450 applications from 24 countries. 111 teams were chosen, representing all industries and levels of development within the early-stage spectrum. The 4-month program held hundreds of training and networking events, workshops and job fairs. In the end, there were 16 winners; 4 teams won $100K and 12 teams won $50K from the MassChallenge million. The 111 teams went on to raise $100 million in total venture funding and created 500 new jobs in under 12 months. This summer, Ksplice, a 2010 MassChallenge winner, was acquired by Oracle, marking the first exit of a MassChallenge-supported startup…”

READ FULL ARTICLE [web]
MassChallenge Vision [web]
MassChallenge on Facebook [web]
MassChallenge TV [web]

By the numbers: Is basic research worth it?

September 3, 2011 Leave a comment

Across the United States, scientists depend on funding from [federal agencies] to conduct research and pay students and staff. Their research examines a vast array of fields, from the examination of subatomic particles to the birth of galaxies at the edge of the known universe.

From The Statesman:

“During tense economic times, arguments over the federal budget and national debt have caused many Americans to lose sight of the tremendous value of science. But as the nation grows increasingly worried about the economy, are we aware of the real cost of basic research?

Consider the National Science Foundation: Across the United States, scientists depend on funding from the foundation to conduct research and pay students and staff. Their research examines a vast array of fields, from the examination of subatomic particles to the birth of galaxies at the edge of the known universe. These endeavors sound very expensive, yet they only cost each of us about $22 dollars a year…”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE [web]

Categories: Federal

Harvard Accelerator Program, Proving Its Mettle with Startups and Pharma Partnerships, Looks to Raise Big New Fund

August 29, 2011 Leave a comment

The five-year goal for the Accelerator Fund is for one or two drug candidates born from Harvard research to be in Phase 1 clinical trials, and for at least one of the program’s startups to enter into exit talks with another company.

From Xconomy:

“The Accelerator Fund, which Xconomy wrote about in early 2008, was created to help Harvard scientists commercialize their inventions by forming industry partnerships, licensing technology, and starting new companies, primarily in life sciences and biomedical fields. As technology development head and senior associate provost Isaac Kohlberg puts it, “The pipelines of Harvard were empty.” The school “suffered from a branding issue with stakeholders about the role of technology development,” he says.

Kohlberg and his team, which includes Curtis Keith, chief scientific officer of the Accelerator Fund, were brought in to overhaul Harvard’s tech transfer and development offices…”

READ FULL ARTICLE [web]
Harvard’s Office of Technology Development [web]
Technology Development Accelerator Fund [web]

To Be or Not To Be: University Incubators

August 22, 2011 Leave a comment

Should universities create, own, and operate an incubator?

It’s all about community engagement and prosperity through innovation and economic development.

By Keith McDowell:

“From a whimper to a shout out! Such is the history of university business incubators over the past decade. From the existence of a countable few before the year 2000, universities, colleges, and even community colleges have “manned up” on the issue of creating incubators at every crossroad and in every community. It’s all about community engagement and prosperity through innovation and economic development. And as might be expected, the “incubators” come in so many varieties that they are no longer countable. Is it an incubator or an accelerator, virtual space or leased real estate, profitable or subsidized?”

READ FULL ARTICLE [web]

Lockheed Martin Partners with Universities to Support DOD Small Business and Academic Research Programs

August 22, 2011 Leave a comment

Called the Lockheed Martin Innovation Marketplace, the program will support private sector and academic sector technologists in participating in the Department of Defense’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), Technology Transfer (STTR) and Mentor Protege programs.

From PRNewswire:

HUNTSVILLE, Ala., Aug. 17, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) today announced that it is partnering with three universities to establish a program in Huntsville, Ala., that will support small businesses and universities participating in federal technology programs.

Called the Lockheed Martin Innovation Marketplace, the program will support private sector and academic sector technologists in participating in the Department of Defense’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), Technology Transfer (STTR) and Mentor Protege programs. Collaborating with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company are Auburn University, Auburn, Ala., Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Ala., and University of Alabama in Huntsville.

“Working together, Lockheed Martin and our university partners will further increase our active support of Department of Defense programs for small business and academic technology research,” said John W. Holly, vice president of Missile Defense Systems, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. “This local-level initiative will provide national-level benefits by helping bring more cutting-edge technologies into the systems our war fighters rely upon to defend our country…”

Read full press release [web]